Japanese Antiques and Japanese Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Folk Art : Pre 1700 item #760990 (stock #0163)
Japanese Art Site
SOLD
Very Fine and Beautifully Rendered Hono Ema from the Tensho Shrine, dated October 7, 1695. The inscription reads Mikawa Province (modern day eastern Aichi Prefecture), Tomifuku-gun ('county'), Oshiro Mountain. While the wealthy would often give a horse as a gift to a Shinto shrine, the common person would give a Hono Ema (literally 'gift horse picture'). These plaques are then left hanging up at the shrine for the gods to see. This is a rare and museum quality work of Japanese Folk Art from the collection of a renowned author on and collector of Asian art. 23.5 x 16.5 inches, 60 x 42 cm.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Folk Art : Pre 1900 item #587535 (stock #0124)
Japanese Art Site
$200.00
Antique Japanese Carpenter Reel, Sumi Tsubo, Ink Line. 9.25 x 3 inches, 23.5 x 8 cm. It is rare to see sumi tsubo (Japanese carpenter's reel or inkline used for layout) fully intact with all its parts, including line and original stick pin, like this one. The Japanese word for tools is Dogu, which was originally the word for an itinerant monk's belongings. It alludes to the spiritual value which craftsmen put on their tools. Japanese antique carpenter tools are now artifacts with history and beauty and lots of personality, and of course now make great decorative objects. In the West, there were no carpentry tools in which the ink well, marking thread, winding wheel, and stickpin were united into one piece. This tool played a pivotal role in the development of Japanese architecture. They are beautiful hand carved sculpture and works of art in their own right. From a renowned and published collection in New York.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Folk Art : Pre 1900 item #587534 (stock #0123)
Japanese Art Site
$200.00
Antique Japanese Carpenter Reel, Sumi Tsubo, Ink Line. 8.25 x 3.5 inches, 21 x 9 cm. It is rare to see sumi tsubo (Japanese carpenter's reel or inkline used for layout) fully intact with all its parts, including line and original stick pin, like this one. The Japanese word for tools is Dogu, which was originally the word for an itinerant monk's belongings. It alludes to the spiritual value which craftsmen put on their tools. Japanese antique carpenter tools are now artifacts with history and beauty and lots of personality, and of course now make great decorative objects. In the West, there were no carpentry tools in which the ink well, marking thread, winding wheel, and stickpin were united into one piece. This tool played a pivotal role in the development of Japanese architecture. They are beautiful hand carved sculpture and works of art in their own right. From a renowned and published collection in New York.